Historic Jacksonville, Inc. brings the history of Jacksonville and Southern Oregon to life through tours, events, and activities that share the stories of the pioneers who settled the region following the discovery of gold in 1852.  

 

Beginning Friday, May 5, ghosts and spirits from Jacksonville’s pioneer past will again be the subjects of Historic Jacksonville’s Haunted History walking tours.   On the first Friday of each Month from May through September, costumed docents will share notable tales of woe, sorrow, and regret.

These tours are not your typical ‘ghost tours’ with special effects.   They are history tours about real hauntings resulting from past events.  The stories—some scary, some benign—come from multiple sources, from people who have experienced these lingering spirits.  These tours are our attempt to recognize and honor these restless souls.  And 2 different tour routes are being offered—a Britt Hill tour with saloons, Oregon’s first Chinatown, and two of the most haunted houses in town; and a Courthouse route with tales of brothels, epidemics and hangings.

Also be sure to “like” Historic Jacksonville, Inc. (historicjville) on Facebook for weekly snippets of local history each History Trivia Tuesday!  And our History Mystery is back for March, April, and May when spring cleaning again has us tackling Great Grandma’s attic.  Here’s your chance to enter drawings for gift certificates to local restaurants and merchants when you correctly identify unusual historical objects we’ve come across.

Jacksonville-1883 Lithograph

 Jacksonville 1883 (lithograph)

When Oregon was admitted to the Union in 1859, Jacksonville was the largest inland trade center in the new state, and Jacksonville and its residents played a dominant role in early Oregon history and statehood. But when the railroad by-passed Jacksonville in the 1880s, the town slowly sank into oblivion. However, that oblivion also proved to be the town’s salvation, preserving the historic buildings, homes, and character that you see today—Jacksonville’s National Historic Landmark District. Today, these landmarks live again through the efforts of the City of Jacksonville, volunteers, and private owners so that you can again experience Jacksonville in its heyday.